Pesto

Pesto! Who doesn’t like Pesto? With it’s aromatic fragrance and delicious flavors of cheese, pine nuts, and garlic…it’s just wonderful. If you haven’t figured it out yet, I will be making dinner tonight with pesto.

Ingredients: 2 cups Fresh Basil, 4 good sized Garlic Cloves, 1 cup Pine Nut’s or shelled walnuts, 1 cup Extra Virgin Olive Oil, 1 cup Parmesan Cheese, 1/4 Romano Cheese, 1/8 cup Fresh Mozzarella, 1/8 cup Fontina Cheese, and Salt and Pepper to taste.

(Now the original recipe doesn’t call for Mozzarella or Fontina cheese but I thought why not)

Combine the basil, garlic, and nuts in a food processor and chop. Next leave the motor running and add the olive oil in a slow steady stream. Finally turn off the processor and add the cheeses, a big pinch of salt, and a liberal grinding of pepper. Processes briefly. Then scrape out into a bowl and over whatever you want to marinade or use in, or cover and place in the refrigerator until ready to use.

Now I absolutely LOVE Pesto! You might think that I was Italian with how much I eat it too. But Pesto is always the best when it is freshly made at home with fresh ingredients. I will be marinading chicken in the Pesto and grilling when dinner time comes. My mouth is just watering just thinking about it!

I’m also trying to figure out a way to make Chipotle Pesto. So far I don’t exactly know how to yet, but when I do, I’ll be sure to post it right here.

History: Pesto originated in Genoa in the Liguria region in northern Italy. Pesto is the contracted past participle of the Genoese word for pesta which means to pound or to crush.

Now in  French Province area, the dish evolved into the modern pistou, a combination of  fresh basil, parsley, crushed garlic, and cheese (optional). No nuts are in the French version.

Pesto didn’t become popular in America until 1980’s and 1990’s. But the New York times mentioned the first can of imported Pesto in 1944 and in 1946 the Sunset Times published a pesto recipe by Angelo Pellegrini.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s